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Narragansett RI Charters and Sports Fishing Directions to Narragansett Narragansett RI Beaches

Narragansett has four of the best  beaches in Rhode Island

Narragansett Town Beach
Located in the center of town, is a favorite of both visitors and Town residents. The beach offers ample parking in the north, south, west, and cabana areas, offering approximately 1000 spots. There are concessions, surfing areas, and activity areas. Total beach acreage is around 19.

SALTY BRINE STATE BEACH
ACREAGE: 1.1 Acres
DATE STATE ACQUIRED: Between 1954 and 1956
PREVIOUS OWNERS: Department of Public Works and Division of Harbors and Rivers
OTHER NAMES: Galilee State Beach
HISTORY: Formerly known as Galilee State Beach, Salty Brine State Beach was dedicated in 1990 to Rhode Island's most widely recognized radio personality, Salty Brine.
The pier and surrounding area have always been heavily utilized by fishermen, commercial and recreational, and also by the public who enjoy watching the boats come and go all day long.
During the Revolutionary War, British ships frequently sailed through the natural breachway and anchored there. After the war, the breachway became a great asset to the farmers in the area who brought their crops by wagon to a shoreline warehouse in the region.
As you can see, from the 1800's and on through the years, the Galilee area has been a very valuable resource and will continue to remain so for some time to come.

SCARBOROUGH STATE BEACH

Scarborough Beach is Rhode Islandšs most popular and well known beach. Located 35 miles south of Providence on Ocean Road in Narragansett, it is a 26 acre facility with 2,325 feet of beach frontage.
Scarborough was originally developed in 1937. It has long been known as the principal destination for a "day at the beach" for thousands of Rhode Islanders over the years.
With the acquisition of Olivošs and Lidošs beaches to the south of Scarborough, the State of Rhode Island now has an additional 16 acres and over 1,000 feet of beach frontage for expanding the saltwater recreational facilities at Scarborough. After many years of use, the State in 1987, embarked on a multiphase/multimillion dollar restoration and redevelopment project for Scarborough, Olivošs and Lidošs.
The State of Rhode Island has one of the finest, if not, the finest saltwater beach and recreational facility in Southeastern New England. It is hoped that this facility will help to maintain the positive image of Rhode Islandšs saltwater beaches, and to continue to provide, not only to this generation but future generations of Rhode Islanders, a quality experience for a "day at the beach".
Scarborough State Beach with its newly renovated pavilion and expanded beach area along with renovations to the Olivošs and Lidošs beach areas, which are now referred to as the Scarborough South Complex, will offer a wide range of beach related activities. Saltwater bathing with lifeguards on duty from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm will continue to be Scarboroughšs biggest attraction along with picnicking, an observation tower with scenic views and boardwalk. People of all ages will find activities of interest from sun bathing on Scarboroughšs sandy beach, and people watching on its boardwalk to picnicking under shaded shelters, and saltwater bathing in one of Rhode Islandšs most popular spots.

ROGER WHEELER STATE BEACH
ACREAGE: 27 Acres
DATE STATE ACQUIRED: 1929
PREVIOUS OWNERS: John Bull (a Tory)
ORIGIN OF NAME: The beach was renamed in grateful remembrance in 1970 by the people of the State of Rhode Island for Captain Roger W. Wheeler (1907-1969) who developed the Rhode Island State Life-Saving System.
OTHER NAMES: Sand Hill Cove (prior to 1970)
DEDICATION CEREMONY: August 15, 1970
GENERAL HISTORY: The Tory and Wig Parties were in constant conflict with Parliament in England during the American Revolution on the mid 1700's. The two parties alternated between power in Parliament and also in the colonies. In the middle to late 1700's the land was confiscated by the State. In 1935 it was transferred by the Secretary of State from the Metropolitan Park Commission to the Department of Agriculture and Conservation, Division of Forest, Parks and Parkways. Then in 1949 to the Division of Parks and Recreation and Department of Transportation. Later in 1965 it was transferred to the Department of Natural Resources which, in 1975 became the Department of Environmental Management. After much litigation with the heirs and with about ninety "squatters" who had built summer homes along the waterfront, title was finally cleared in 1943, and a large modern bathhouse and parking facilities were constructed between 1955 and 1956. In 1977 a 160 foot ramp that extends from the parking lot to the beach was built for handicapped people so that they may enjoy the beach. In 1979 another 160 foot ramp was constructed on the opposite side of the bathhouse also to help the handicapped.
RECENT HISTORY: In October of 1996, demolition of the "modern bathhouse" built in 1955 began, and soon after, construction of a new facility. The new bathhouse, a $1.3 million building, was officially opened in a ribbon cutting ceremony on June 21, 1997. Funding for the new facility came partially through state financing and partially through the National Park Service. Architectural designs are by William L. Burgin, Inc., and the construction of the building was performed by Berkshire Construction Services. The new pavilion, which was specifically designed for ease in maintenance, has such modern amenities as: special doors which won't rust or corrode, aluminum and stainless steel hardware, aluminum grates at bathhouse entrances to prevent sand-clogged drains, heavy-duty barn like doors used to close off sections that are not in use, modern  bathhouses with coin-operated hot showers, a playground, concession building, lifeguard tower, and naturalist area.